Tag Archives: architecture

Instagram #1

I’ve been lax at blog posts this year (there are ones coming on the Tudor Pull, Marlborough St Magistrates Court and Michael Fagan, honest), but as I’m out and about on the Blue Badge Guide stuff I occasionally manage to take some pictures and load them up to instagram.

You can follow what I shoot if you look for ‘donbrowndotlondon’, but here’s a selection of recent images from across the capital.

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The Lloyd’s Building

outside-columnIn 1978, the year after architect Richard Rogers’ Pompidou Centre opened in Paris, construction started on his first major London project, The Lloyd’s Building in Lime Street.

Built to house the London Insurance Market, this was the first “high tech” building in the UK and there is still nothing quite like it.

The building is “inside out”, with the service functions placed on the exterior. The pipework and air conditioning ducts wrapped around the outside, the glass lifts scooting up the outside walls, the corner staircases like corkscrew metal are all still a delight to behold. But the concept is not decorative per se: it allows for easy replacement and maintenance of the facilities, and it means the inside can be open and flexible, with uninterrupted activity on each level. Rogers has designed other buildings in London since Lloyd’s, but none provoke the same sense of looking at something otherworldly. Continue reading

One New Change

One New ChangeThe architect of One New Change, Jean Nouvel, described his building as a ‘stealth bomber’; it’s something very big – well over half a million square feet of shops, restaurants and offices spread over eight floors – designed to almost be unnoticed.

The main reason for this of course is its proximity to St Paul’s. Certain views of the cathedral are legally protected. These are generally the views from some major London parks – Richmond, Greenwich, Alexandra Palace, Hampstead Heath and Primrose Hill – which aren’t allowed to be blocked by tall buildings. That’s why the really big skyscrapers in the City tend to cluster in the East and why there aren’t any in the area around the cathedral.

So One New Change hasn’t been allowed to impose on St Paul’s, but what it has done is to give us some great new views. Coming up the escalator with the dome appearing in front of you is a wonderful experience, as is riding in the glass lift; the panels in the central atrium reflect views of the Cathedral so that you’re aware of its presence whichever way you look; and on the sixth floor is a terrace that puts you on a level with the roof of St Paul’s – you feel like you can almost reach out and touch it. Continue reading